New to Yoga? How to Find a Great Yoga Class in Melbourne for Your Type

Yoga is not merely a great form of exercise—it is also an excellent way to promote harmony between your soul and body. It can even set you off on a spiritual journey to find inner peace. There are many different studios and gyms offering yoga in Melbourne, but the selection can become overwhelming. Should you choose Iyengar and Ashtanga? Which classes are for complete beginners? You must have a lot of questions.

To get started, find a reputable and established practitioner of Ayurveda and yoga. You need an expert who has been practising yoga and Ayurvedic medicine for years. Some specialists can provide yoga training and therapeutic yoga to treat certain conditions, like age-related body ailments and obesity. Some of the best ones have years of experience in providing yoga to all types of learners, from the elderly down to young children.

Find out the different types of yoga that are offered in Melbourne.  Hatha yoga is generally good for beginners because it is slower and will require you to hold poses and learn proper breathing techniques. Vinyasa links breath and movements together like a dance to raise your heart rate, making it good for endurance athletes, runners, and intense exercisers. Iyengar is more advanced and concerned about detail, precision, and the body’s alignment in every pose. This time, blankets, yoga blocks, and other props are used.

Ashtanga is challenging and it is performed in six series of sequenced poses to build internal heat. You may have to perform the same poses in order, to make this type of yoga a good choice if you like to follow routines and you are disciplined enough to adhere to strict guidelines. If you are completely new to yoga but want to really sweat, try Bikram. It is a bit similar to Ashtanga in a sense that it makes you do two breathing exercises and a series of 26 consecutive poses in a heated room. Hot yoga is an alternative to Bikram, but without the routine poses.  Kundalini provides both a workout and a highly spiritual element by combining mentally and physically challenging exercises.